Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle.
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Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle.

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Published by Free Press of Glencoe in [New York] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Philosophy, Ancient

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementTranslated with an introd. by Muhsin Mahdi.
SeriesAgora editions
ContributionsMahdi, Muhsin, ed. and tr.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB753.F33 P53
The Physical Object
Pagination158 p.
Number of Pages158
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5851604M
LC Control Number62011856

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The three parts of the book, "Attainment of Happiness," "Philosophy of Plato," and "Philosophy of Aristotle," provide a philosophical foundation for. This long-awaited reissue of the Cornell edition of Alfarabi's Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle contains Muhsin Mahdi's substantial original introduction and a new foreword by Charles E. Butterworth and Thomas L. Pangle.4/5.   The book makes accessible five centuries of philosophical thinking, identifies with crystal clarity the philosophical problems that concerned the commentators, and discusses them with historical accuracy and philosophical s: 2.   A brilliant and concise account of the lives and ideas of the great philosophers—Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, Spencer, Nietzsche, Bergson, Croce, Russell, Santayana, James, and Dewey—The Story of Philosophy is one of the great books of our write for the non-specialist as well as Will Durant, and this book is a splendid example of his eminently Reviews:   (2) Aristotle wrote in Greek, so the original text must be translated into English and various other languages worldwide, to facilitate understanding by those who do not read Ancient Greek. Many find this very useful. (3) E.g. Aristotle, it is accepted, was Plato's student. Plato was, in turn, Socrates' student/5(28).

  But Taylor's method of reading Plato in terms of the subsequent history of philosophy, or of translating Plato's arguments and ideas into the terms of more modern philosophers is no longer the preferred method of reading Plato (for example, when he says that "for Socrates and Plato, no less than for Kant, immortality is a postulate of the Cited by: pt. 1. The attainment of happinesspt. 2. The philosophy of Plato, its parts, the ranks of order of its parts, from the beginning to the endpt. 3. The philosophy of Aristotle, the parts of his philosophy, the ranks of order of its parts, the position from which he started and the one he reached. Series Title: Agora editions. Other Titles. SUNY Press, Jan 1, - Philosophy - pages 0 Reviews In this book Reale presents Plato and Aristotle. At the center of Reale's interpretation of Plato is the fulcrum of the supersensible, the. According to a conventional view, Plato’s philosophy is abstract and utopian, whereas Aristotle’s is empirical, practical, and commonsensical. Such contrasts are famously suggested in the fresco School of Athens (–11) by the Italian Renaissance painter Raphael, which depicts Plato and Aristotle together in conversation, surrounded by philosophers, scientists, and artists of earlier and later ages. .

In philosophy, essence is the property or set of properties that make an entity or substance what it fundamentally is, and which it has by necessity, and without which it loses its e is contrasted with accident: a property that the entity or substance has contingently, without which the substance can still retain its concept originates rigorously with Aristotle. OCLC Number: Description: xxv, pages 19 cm. Contents: The attainment of happinessThe philosophy of Plato, its parts, the ranks of order of its parts, from the beginning to the endThe philosopy of Aristotle, the parts of his philosophy, the ranks of order of its parts, the position from which he started and the one he reached.   As I read him, Aristotle not only did not believe in the conception of intrinsic human dignity that grounds our modern commitment to human rights, he has a philosophy . Many modern books on Plato seem to diminish its importance; nevertheless, the first important witness who mentions its existence is Aristotle, who in his Physics writes: "It is true, indeed, that the account he gives there [i.e. in Timaeus] of the participant is different from what he says in his so-called unwritten teachings (ἄγραφα δόγματα)."Era: Ancient Greek philosophy.